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3 Steps for Installing Electric Fence Posts

Posted by Jamie Whitbeck on

Your choices in electric fence post installation will be largely based on what critter you’re trying to contain. You’ll also want to consider your budget, the wiring, the lay of the land, and how long you want the fence to last.

1. Choosing your primary fence materials

Each type of material has different requirements for spacing. For example, standard electric fence line can be spaced anywhere from 10-20 feet apart, based on the type of terrain you’re dealing with. Poly-tape and poly-wire requires closer spacing to keep it taut, between 10-12 feet apart. High tensile wires can be as far apart as 90 feet on level terrain with docile animals, and as close together as 15 feet for hilly terrain.

2. Choose which types of posts to use

Once you’ve determined the type of fencing you’ll be using, you’ll want to choose what types of posts to incorporate. T-Posts, rebar posts, and fiberglasses posts are the easiest and least expensive to install, while wood posts add a rustic look to the fence, if you’re considered aesthetics. Wood posts also add another layer of strength to your fence. Either way, you’ll also need insulating posts to ensure that your electric charge is uninhibited and effective.

3. Start digging and hammering!

No matter what material you chose for your main fence line, it is recommended that you put wood posts at any corners. The corners take the majority of the tension-load from the fence, and other post options simply won’t last as long as a solid wood post. You’ll also want to brace these posts using brace-wire, which helps to pull the post the opposite way that the fence’s tension is pulling.

Additional tips

  1. To set your wood posts, mark the ground where you plan to start your hole. You can either pound your post into the ground or use a post-hole digger. Either way, you’re looking for a depth of at least 3 feet.
  2. For t-posts, rebar posts, and fiberglass posts, you’ll want to purchase a tool called a “post pounder.” These can be found at any tractor supply store. They make it easier and safer to pound in these kinds of supports.